meninkimono:

I didn’t translate a couple of terms:
-きせ分- the excess fabric of a fold beyond the stitching seam (is there a word in English for this?)
-きせ山 - the “mountain” that is created in the other side when the きせ分 is sewed down
The basic plan:
- Sew a fold horizontally across the back bodice.
- Press the fold down.
- Blindstitch the fold down.
- Sew the center back seam, press it down.
To be continued… we are not done with the body yet!

meninkimono:

I didn’t translate a couple of terms:

-きせ分- the excess fabric of a fold beyond the stitching seam (is there a word in English for this?)

-きせ山 - the “mountain” that is created in the other side when the きせ分 is sewed down

The basic plan:

- Sew a fold horizontally across the back bodice.

- Press the fold down.

- Blindstitch the fold down.

- Sew the center back seam, press it down.

To be continued… we are not done with the body yet!

meninkimono:

Making Yukata: Laying out the pattern
A few notes on laying out the pattern before we go on, please refer to here for your sizing. The following assumes use of a Japanese bolt, but can also be adapted for a Western bolt.
1. Marking sleeves
Please note that you should mark seam allowances of 1 cm. The other key points are to mark the wrist opening at 27 cm from the fold, mark the fold itself, mark the curve of the sleeve, and the (tiny) unsewn underarm part.

2. Cutting the body
This part is fairly straightforward- just make sure the front and back are even when cutting- the idea of using a yardstick to make the shoulder crease is cute.
3. Marking the (front and back) body
Key point: those parallel lines crossing the fabric are where you will sew the fold. Also, note the angling where the okumi (triangular front panel) will be attached. On the bottom diagram note where the cut for the neck is placed: in line with the shoulder seam unlike in female yukata construction.

4. Marking okumi
Remember those dotted lines are to be marked and folded, not cut!
5. Marking the eri (collar) and tomoeri
Please note how the collar is folded in the first diagram. The fabric to the left becomes the eri, the fabric to the right becomes the tomoeri- the fabric that protects the actual collar. Below, each is shown as they should be marked.
And that’s it! We are now ready to sew!

meninkimono:

Making Yukata: Laying out the pattern

A few notes on laying out the pattern before we go on, please refer to here for your sizing. The following assumes use of a Japanese bolt, but can also be adapted for a Western bolt.


1. Marking sleeves


Please note that you should mark seam allowances of 1 cm. The other key points are to mark the wrist opening at 27 cm from the fold, mark the fold itself, mark the curve of the sleeve, and the (tiny) unsewn underarm part.

2. Cutting the body

This part is fairly straightforward- just make sure the front and back are even when cutting- the idea of using a yardstick to make the shoulder crease is cute.

3. Marking the (front and back) body

Key point: those parallel lines crossing the fabric are where you will sew the fold. Also, note the angling where the okumi (triangular front panel) will be attached. On the bottom diagram note where the cut for the neck is placed: in line with the shoulder seam unlike in female yukata construction.

4. Marking okumi

Remember those dotted lines are to be marked and folded, not cut!

5. Marking the eri (collar) and tomoeri

Please note how the collar is folded in the first diagram. The fabric to the left becomes the eri, the fabric to the right becomes the tomoeri- the fabric that protects the actual collar. Below, each is shown as they should be marked.

And that’s it! We are now ready to sew!

meninkimono:

Making Yukata: Sewing the Sleeve
Sorry this is taking so long guys- I forgot how crummy Japanese sewing instructions are. Also, I thought this was written for young women so the kanji would stick to the standard sewing terms. Hahaha- no.
The general plan goes:
1. Sew sleeves
2. Sew body
3. Baste okumi
4. Sew hem
5. Baste erri
6. Baste tomoeri
7. Baste on sleeves
General Notes:
-The sleeve is sewn with three kinds of stitches- a standard sewing machine stitch, a zig zag machine stitch, and a hand sewn blind stitch at the cuff.
-You will need to make a template for shaping the sleeve corner- using some thin cardboard is fine. Trace something gently round, like the lid of a coffee can to make a smooth curve at the corner- it should not be a deep curve like a woman’s yukata. Use the same template for both sleeves- that way they are sure to be equal.
-All the finishing and reenforcing the bottom of the sleeve will allow you to place objects in it as a pocket. I frequently carry things in my yukata sleeves.

meninkimono:

Making Yukata: Sewing the Sleeve

Sorry this is taking so long guys- I forgot how crummy Japanese sewing instructions are. Also, I thought this was written for young women so the kanji would stick to the standard sewing terms. Hahaha- no.

The general plan goes:

1. Sew sleeves

2. Sew body

3. Baste okumi

4. Sew hem

5. Baste erri

6. Baste tomoeri

7. Baste on sleeves

General Notes:

-The sleeve is sewn with three kinds of stitches- a standard sewing machine stitch, a zig zag machine stitch, and a hand sewn blind stitch at the cuff.

-You will need to make a template for shaping the sleeve corner- using some thin cardboard is fine. Trace something gently round, like the lid of a coffee can to make a smooth curve at the corner- it should not be a deep curve like a woman’s yukata. Use the same template for both sleeves- that way they are sure to be equal.

-All the finishing and reenforcing the bottom of the sleeve will allow you to place objects in it as a pocket. I frequently carry things in my yukata sleeves.

jcpadrino said: Hello! I want to know if you have or know about a tutorial for make a men yukata? I Will be apreciate the information. Thanks.

meninkimono:

Wow, this takes me back- my entry into the online kitsuke community was sharing scans of how to make yukata. I will heavily quote myself circa 2010 for this one. We are going to use ゆかたを手作り (ISBN4-8347-2427-1).

First some finished product looks, so you can get an idea of what kind of pattern you want on your cotton.

imageimage

Now the instruction in Japanese, followed by explanations.

image

Now to choose the size you want, you need a couple of your own measurements in cm. See where in the box it says ? That means ‘width’. means ‘length’. Okay, not so hard so far. The very first line asks for your height. The pattern says a S is for someone 166 cm tall (5’5), M for 174 cm (5’8.5), and L is for 180 cm (5’10). That’s okay, we can just add length to the bottom. Deep breaths, everything will be okay. If you fall between 5’5 to 5’11 everything is good so far.

The third line asks for your nape to wrist length. Measure from your first palpable vertebrae to your wrist bone (or rather have a friend do it for you). Remember to check your arm length if you are increasing the total length since that’s more often a problem with tall men’s garments than in women’s.

The next lines that start with are about the sleeve, so ignore it for now.

Now comes 後ろ (back width). This is half the actual width of the back, because the seam runs down the back. Double this number and add it to the next number, (front width), also doubled to determine the size of hips the yukata is for. The front of the men’s pattern doesn’t vary, but the back does. Measure your widest point, either your waist or hips. S fits 110 cm (43 in), M fits 112 cm (44 in), L fits 114 cm (~45 in).

Now we must measure out our pieces. The arrangement below is for a Japanese width bolt. You will be able to lay things out side by side on a western bolt. General layout thoughts:

image The pattern is across the bottom of the page, for a Japanese bolt and in the middle of the page for a Western bolt:

image

image Deep breaths. It’s not as complicated as it appears. We just need to apply our size choice from before to the pattern. The numbers are already written for us, the bold numbers are the M size. Written at the very bottom is the yardage required (sorry metric users, I’m going to still call it yardage, is meterage even a word?) using Japanese bolts. Notice if you make a L with a Western bolt, you only need 440 cm instead of 1140 cm with a Japanese bolt.

Remember when you layout your pattern a dotted line is a fold and a solid line is a cut.

To be continued in Part II: The sewing.

gaywitchesforabortions:

tehbewilderness:

the-fly-agaric:

bajo-el-mar:

Reading about abusive men and the way they think. Very unsettling and an incredible book so far. Here are my very professional notes.

what book is this?

This is from “Why Does He DO That” by Lundy Bancroft.

I’m so glad I’m seeing more and more Lundy Bancroft quotes on my dash because this book CHANGES THE LIVES OF ABUSE VICTIMS.The programs run for rehabilitating abusive men through the courts? Bancroft DESIGNED THEM. His programs are replicated ALL OVER THE WORLD.He literally wrote THE book on abuser rehabilitation.

gaywitchesforabortions:

tehbewilderness:

the-fly-agaric:

bajo-el-mar:

Reading about abusive men and the way they think. Very unsettling and an incredible book so far. Here are my very professional notes.

what book is this?

This is from “Why Does He DO That” by Lundy Bancroft.

I’m so glad I’m seeing more and more Lundy Bancroft quotes on my dash because this book CHANGES THE LIVES OF ABUSE VICTIMS.

The programs run for rehabilitating abusive men through the courts? Bancroft DESIGNED THEM. His programs are replicated ALL OVER THE WORLD.
He literally wrote THE book on abuser rehabilitation.

(via mangofedora)

drinkyourfuckingmilk:

hange’s like “dear diary, today was a gold star day; I broke levi for the eleventh time”

i think levi wanted to laugh but he hasn’t in so long that his brain just shut down

mangafedora your tags had me laughing before i even read the comic and then i died some more. also- levi’s baby hangs breaking that guys nose

(via mangofedora)

gokaigato:

Nailed it.

may have choked a little lmao

rachellephant:

tips to write college papers 

  • begin with “buckle your seatbelts, motherfuckers, because in eight short pages i am going to learn u a thing that i only learned myself about two hours ago, so sit down, shut up, and enjoy the experience of my 4-am-redbull-induced-self-hatred-fuelled-writing-extravaganza”
  • erase when finished with the paper

(via verolpstalker)

thedailymeme:

Some times you just have to walk away.

thedailymeme:

Some times you just have to walk away.

(Source: pwnagearcade, via verolpstalker)

collegehumor:

pancakes-and-penguins:

This is the single best post I’ve ever seen. 

Parents need to teach their children these man tips.

(Source: pleatedjeans, via verolpstalker)